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ATN driving stronger links with India through collaboration in education and research

20 November 2019

With the number of Indian students studying at Australian universities soaring by more than 34 per cent last year, now is the time to strengthen our partnerships and build new ones with one of the world’s fastest growing economies.

Australian Technology Network of Universities (ATN) Executive Director Luke Sheehy will join Education Minister Dan Tehan and other leaders of Australia’s education sector on a delegation to India.
Over 10 per cent of ATN’s international students are from India, making it our second highest international student base, behind China.

Mr Sheehy said he hoped to further develop our already strong research links with India and illustrate what cross-border and global relationships can continue to achieve.

“Our universities have already forged invaluable partnerships with India’s vast network of educational and research institutions” Mr Sheehy said.

“We want to showcase our universities and what they offer: a diverse, innovative and safe second home for potential Indian students.”

Current collaborations between our universities and Indian institutions include:

• The Australia-India Research Centre for Automation Software Engineering through RMIT University
• UniSA’s partnership with PSG Institute of Advanced Studies featuring conferences, student and staff exchange programs and a joint computational neuroscience laboratory
• UTS’s engagement with the Indian Institute of Technology Madras Chennai through joint PhDs and student and staff exchange
• A collaborative doctoral degree program developed between Curtin University and the Indian Institutes of Technology in Bombay, Kharagpur, Madras, Guwahati, Kanpur and Dhanbad.

“Strengthening ATN’s ties and forging new ones is critical for building Australia’s relationship with one of the most important countries in our region.”

Mr Sheehy will also attend several round table discussions and visit of some of India’s high-quality output research centres.