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Examples of Student Projects

These are examples of non-confidential research projects where IDTC Students have partnered with organisations.

Save a minute – Save a day

Every minute counts in the treatment of stroke patients

University: RMIT

Industry Partner: Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health

Industry Supervisor: Professor Leonid Churilov

IDTC Student: Mahsa Keshtkaran

Academic Supervisors: Professor John Hearne, School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences  

In conjunction with industry partner Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health and as a part of a team of Australian and international collaborators, IDTC researcher Mahsa Keshtkaran has implemented a model that demonstrated that each minute of stroke onset-to-treatment time saved results on average in an 1.8 days of extra healthy life.

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Improving the fresh blood supply chain

Ensuring blood is available when it is needed most.

University: RMIT

Industry Partner: Australian Red Cross Blood Service

IDTC Student: Nigel Clay

Academic Supervisors: Dr Andrew Eberhard, School of Science, Dr Babak Abbasi, School of Business, IT and Logistics 

IDTC student Nigel Clay partnered with the Australian Red Cross Blood service to develop a model to optimise hospital order quantities and blood bank requests for donation, ensuring that fresh blood is available when and where it is needed most.

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Personalised modelling of developmental milestones and treatment of children with disabilities

University: QUT

Industry Partner: The Developing Foundation

Industry Supervisor: Hugh McKenzie, Data and Research Manager

IDTC Student: Patricia Gilholm

Academic Supervisors: Dr Helen Thompson, Associate Professor James McGree, Distinguished Professor Kerrie Mengersen, School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty 

IDTC student Patricia Gilholm has partnered with The Developing Foundation to create and apply suitable Bayesian methods for modelling developmental milestones and to assess the effectiveness of treatment for young children with rare and heterogeneous disabilities.

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